Thursday, 21 October 2010

Pekinese Stitch

Pekinese Stitch or Chinese Stitch as it is also known was used primarily in Chinese embroideries. Apparently it was worked on a tiny scale and gave the embroiderer eyesight problems hence it was also called Blind Stitch! Pekinese Stitch is made by working a line of backstitches and then threading with a contrasting colour or thread thickness. It gives a decorative braid-like appearance for borders, but can also be used as a filling stitch.

To work Pekinese Stitch first work your row of backstitches. Next using a contrasting thread, bring your needle up at 1 (note this is the only time the thread enters the fabric till you get to the end of your row) take your needle up under the second stitch at 2, and then down again through the first stitch at 3, the loop of thread should be beneath the needle as shown. Pull through gently. You can tighten the loop or leave it slightly loose for a different effect. In the last example I created a tufted effect by working the rows of Pekinese Stitch close together.








13 comments:

  1. Yummy, what a gorgeous confection! Its a bit like whipped stitch I learned in primary school except we pulled the thread tight to make a border around a needle case (about a hundred years ago). Thanks.

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  2. I love this stitch, gotta try it, SOON!

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  3. Such super neat stitching & the peach colour is lovely! Greetings from Tokyo, Japan!

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  4. Thank you! This is beautiful as a filler or an outline.

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  5. I loved to learn this stitch! It is EXACTLY what I was looking for! Thank you so much!

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  6. oooh I didn't know this stitch. I can't wait to try it!

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  7. Thanks for leaving a comment, glad you like the stitch!

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  8. What a lovable post!Is it pearl cotton?

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  9. I can see stitchin a little basket using this stitch, it would give it some texture, sort of like basket weave

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  10. That sounds a great idea Linda!

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  11. Wonderful way to fill a large surface with texture.

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  12. Yes this is definitely a useful filling stitch!

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Sarah